Triskele - symbol of continously moving forward

Posted by Michael Kehoe on

The Triskele, also known as the Triskelion, dates back as far as 3200 BC in Ireland.

The symbol can be seen on the stones within the ancient burial site Newgrange.

The triskeleAlthough it is associated with Ireland, the Triskele symbol is believed to have first appeared in ancient Greece, where it was used to mark pottery and coins.

It is particularly linked with the island of Sicily, which was once a Greek colony.

The symbol found its way to Ireland and the Celts incorporated it into many of their designs.

They believed the three spirals represented their belief that everything happens in threes, such as past, present and future, or mother, father and child, and body, mind and spirit.

The continuous movement of the triskele also suits the Celts belief in continuously moving forward.

Later on in Ireland, the Christian Church also adopted the triskele as a means of teaching about the Holy Trinity.

As well as Ireland, the triskele can be found in other regions around the world.

For example, it is used on the logo of the US Department of Transportation, and features on the national flags of the Isle of Man, Brittany and Sicily.


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